Liverpool Celebrant: Did you know that you can make your own wedding rings?

 

The majority of couples choose to exchange wedding rings during their wedding ceremony.  The wedding ring is a circle that symbolises everlasting love - it has no beginning and no end.  

 

We can't be exactly sure where, or when, the tradition started but there is evidence, in ancient Egypt, of decoratively braided papyrus being worn on the fingers to symbolise eternity.  Obviously, papyrus isn't very durable and it was replaced by rings made from leather, bone and ivory and, eventually, metal.  

 

Wedding rings, throughout history, have been worn on different fingers of both hands.  The UK tradition of "third finger, left hand"  is thought to be derived from the Romans who believed that there is a vein, running through that finger, which leads to the heart.  Scientists have disproved this existence of the "Vena Amoris" (or vein of love) but it remains as a popular and romantic myth.

 

Whatever your wedding ring is made from, and no matter how much it cost, it will be special, to you, and the symbolism is the same, whichever finger, or hand, it will be worn on.  

 

You may choose to make your own wedding rings.  This is something that my husband, and I, did and it was a fantastic experience and wonderful day.  Every time I look at my wedding ring I think "he made me that" - money can't buy that feeling!  

 

Here is a picture of us, at Selina Campbell, in Manchester (she has since moved to a different studio, but still in Manchester).  Selina is a great teacher and offers a wide variety of different metals - you can even use your own recycled gold.   

 

If Manchester is not convenient for you, try typing "make your own wedding rings" into a search engine.  

 

A lovely way of including your guests, in your ceremony, is to pass your wedding rings around your guests, while they are seated, and ask them to briefly hold the rings and pass on their best wishes, for your future.  Keeping track of the rings can be a useful task for one of the ushers.  It makes sense to tie them to a dish or a ribbon.  You may prefer to use this idea and have a sign asking your guests to do the same thing, but before the ceremony.  This, and any other symbolic element, can be explained by your Celebrant.

 

When you have a Celebrant led wedding, as with every other aspect of your ceremony, you can choose what you want to say when you exchange your wedding rings (your Celebrant will be able to provide examples, and support, if you are a little unsure of where to start).  If you would like further information, don't hesitate to get in touch. 

Hi, I am Lorraine Hull, an award-winning Independent Celebrant, based in Liverpool.  

 

I am most usually asked to conduct ceremonies in North-West England and North Wales but I am happy to travel anywhere within the U.K. or abroad.  

 

At the risk of shouting (and sounding extremely cheesy) "I LOVE MY JOB". 

 

I love to create and conduct personal and personalised Wedding, Partnership, Commitment, Naming, and Celebration of Life ceremonies; anyone, and everyone, is welcome to ask me to work with, and for, them.

 

I believe that all people (and animals) should all be treated kindly, fairly and with respect.

 

We are all unique and we all matter.

 

I advocate kindness, fairness, respect and equality for all through everything that I say and do: Love is Love, Family is Family, Life is Life.

 

You may also like to know that I hold Public Liability and Professional Indemnity insurance, I adhere to a strict code of conduct and I am committed to developing and sharing best practice with my Celebrant colleagues, so that we can all be the best Celebrants that we can possibly be.

 

 

To contact me please email: lorraine@liverpoolcelebrant.co.uk or call: 0744 932 3988

 

 

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